Criminal Justice

Bachelor of Science Degree

Go to the Tuition page to see Payment Options.
Go to the Tuition page to see Payment Options.
Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice

Program Overview

Earn your Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice - at home, at your own pace, with Penn Foster College. Through online learning, you can earn your degree quickly and conveniently.

The objective of the Penn Foster Criminal Justice Degree Program is to teach you advanced administrative skills, criminal justice policies, legal procedures, and operational proficiencies. Your courses include:

  • Correctional Institutions
  • Introduction to Public Policy
  • Juveniles and the Legal Process
  • Administration of Justice
  • Organizational Behavior
  • ... and much more
You'll also choose courses of specific disciplines to coincide with your field of interest. These options include:
  • Substance Abuse and Treatment in Criminal Justice
  • Organized Crime
  • Crime Scene Investigation
  • Family Law
  • White Collar Crime
  • ...and others

Why earn a distance learning Bachelor’s Degree? With the right credentials, you can:

  • Earn $45,000 or more per year* in a career expected to grow more than 19% through 2018.**
  • Work in law enforcement - upholding rules and regulations in the community.
  • Work in security and crime prevention - protecting property and businesses.
  • Work in corrections - working to protect the rights of the public and the rights of prisoners in the institutional setting.

Plus... your tuition includes:

  • All the books and learning aids you need
  • Instructional support
  • Access to student services by website, phone, and mail

Contact Penn Foster College Today.
We'll send you FREE information with absolutely no obligation! Find out more about earning your Bachelor of Science Degree.

*Salary information is based on the "Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition," a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor. Individual student earnings vary based on experience.

**Growth figures represent a ten-year period ending 2018. Source: "National Industry-Occupation Employment Matrix," a publication of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.